Armadillo

We offer proven Armadillo Trapping and Removal.

Are you finding your yard, flower beds, or garden destroyed every morning? How about a mysterious hole the size of a basketball that appeared over night? You could have a family of Armadillos that have moved into your yard. Eco Wildlife Solutions, LLC offers you humane Armadillo Trapping and Removal. If you have ask “How to catch Armadillos? We offer you a turn key solution to removing your problem. We utilize proven methods that are GA DNR approved and meet all humane laws. Eco Wildlife Solutions, LLC has a proven track record with removing your Armadillo issues. If you feel that your loosing the battle in your yard give us a call. We offer cost effective trapping and removal methods to rid your yard of armadillos and can make suggestions to prevent other armadillos from moving into the area.

Serving Metro Atlanta, Bremen, Carrollton, College Park, Columbus, Fayetteville, Franklin, Grantville, Greenville, Griffin, Hogansville, Jonesboro, La Grange, Lovejoy, McDonough, Newnan, Peachtree City, Riverdale, Union City, West Point, and surrounding cities. Call (678)340-3269 to schedule an appointment.

Armadillo Trapping and Removal

Identification

The armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is a rather interesting and unusual animal that has a protective armor of “boney” material on its head, body, and tail. This boney armor has nine movable rings between the shoulder and hip shield.  The head is small with a long, narrow, pig like snout. Canine and incisor teeth are absent. The peg like cheek teeth range in number from seven to nine on each side of the upper and lower jaw. The long tapering tail is encased in 12 bony rings. The track usually appears to be three-toed and shows sharp claw marks. The armadillo is about the size of an opossum, weighing from 8 to 17 pounds (3.5 to 8 kg).

Range

The armadillo ranges from south Texas to the southeastern tip of New Mexico, through Oklahoma, the southeastern corner of Kansas and the southwestern corner of Missouri, most of Arkansas, and southwestern Mississippi. The range also includes southern Alabama, Georgia, and most of Florida.

Habitat

The armadillo prefers dense, shady cover such as brush, woodlands, forests, and areas adjacent to creeks and rivers. Soil texture is also a factor in the animal’s habitat selection. It prefers sandy or loam soils that are loose and porous. The armadillo will also inhabit areas having cracks, crevices, and rocks that are suitable for burrows.

Food Habits

More than 90% of the armadillo’s diet is made up of insects and their larvae. Armadillos also feed on earthworms, scorpions, spiders, and other invertebrates. There is evidence that the species will eat some fruit and vegetable matter such as berries and tender roots in leaf mold, as well as maggots and pupae in carrion. Vertebrates are eaten to a lesser extent, including skinks, lizards, small frogs, and snakes, as well as the eggs of these animals.

General Biology, Reproduction, and Behavior

The armadillo is active primarily from twilight through early morning hours in the summer. In winter it may be active only during the day. The armadillo usually digs a burrow 7 or 8 inches (18 or 20 cm) in diameter and up to 15 feet (4.5 m) in length for shelter and raising young. Burrows are located in rock piles, around stumps, brush piles, or terraces around brush or dense woodlands. Armadillos often have several dens in an area to use for escape. The young are born in a nest within the burrow. The female produces only one litter each year in March or April after a 150-day gestation period. The litter always consists of quadruplets of the same sex. The young are identical since they are derived from a single egg. The armadillo has poor eyesight, but a keen sense of smell. In spite of its cumbersome appearance, the agile armadillo can run well when in danger. It is a good swimmer and is also able to walk across the bottom of small streams.

Damage and Damage Identification

Most armadillo damage occurs as a result of their rooting in lawns, golf courses, vegetable gardens, and flower beds. Characteristic signs of armadillo activity are shallow holes, 1 to 3 inches (2.5 to 7.6 cm) deep and 3 to 5 inches (7.6 to 12.7 cm) wide, which are dug in search of food. They also uproot flowers and other ornamental plants. Some damage has been caused by their burrowing under foundations, driveways, and other structures. Some people complain that armadillos keep them awake at night by rubbing their shells against their houses or other structures. There is evidence that armadillos may be responsible for the loss of domestic poultry eggs. This loss can be prevented through proper housing or fencing of nesting birds. Disease is a factor associated with this species. Armadillos can be infected by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy. The role that armadillos have in human infection, however, has not yet been determined. They may pose a potential risk for humans, particularly in the Gulf Coast region.

Give us a Call (678)340-3269 to schedule an appointment for proven Armadillo Trapping and Removal.

 

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