Birds

Do you have messy birds you want removed or relocated on your property?

Birds on your property can be messy and carry mites and diseases you do not want on your property. Due to Federal Regulation and permits required for removal we offer other options to convince them there are other area’s to occupy other than your home. Due to Federal Laws we are unable to remove any occupied nest but we can remove the nest after the chicks have fledged or flown the nest. We employ hazing techniques from harassment, loud noises, and electronic deterrents to prevent them from making a home on your home. If you require the removal of occupied nest the needed forms from the US Fish and Wildlife can be found here.  After the permits are submitted and approved Eco Wildlife Solutions, LLC may act as your agent in the removal of the birds.

We can solve your bird issues.

Serving Metro Atlanta, Bremen, Carrollton, College Park, Columbus, Fayetteville, Franklin, Grantville, Greenville, Griffin, Hogansville, Jonesboro, La Grange, Lovejoy, McDonough, Newnan, Peachtree City, Riverdale, Union City, West Point, and surrounding cities. Call (678)340-3269 to schedule an appointment.

Pigeons

This is the most common Nuisance Bird we deal with. This is the Pigeon.

 

Identification

Pigeons (Columbia livia) typically have a gray body with a whitish rump, two black bars on the secondary wing feathers, a broad black band on the tail, and red feet. Body color can vary from gray to white, tan, and black. The average weight is 13 ounces (369 g) and the average length is 11 inches (28 cm). When pigeons take off, their wing tips touch, making a characteristic clicking sound. When they glide, their wings are raised at an angle.

Range

Pigeons are found throughout the United States (including Hawaii), southern Canada, and Mexico.

Habitat

Pigeons are highly dependent on humans to provide them with food and sites for roosting, loafing, and nesting. They are commonly found around farm yards, grain elevators, feed mills, parks, city buildings, bridges, and other structures.

Food Habits

Pigeons are primarily grain and seed eaters and will subsist on spilled or improperly stored grain. They also will feed on garbage, livestock manure, insects, or other food materials provided for them intentionally or unintentionally by people. In fact, in some urban areas the feeding of pigeons is considered a form of recreation. They require about 1 ounce (30 ml) of water daily. They rely mostly on free-standing water but they can also use snow to obtain water.

General Biology, Reproduction, and Behavior

The common pigeon was introduced into the United States as a domesticated bird, but many escaped and formed feral populations. The pigeon is now the most common bird pest associated with people.  Pigeons inhabit lofts, steeples, attics, caves, and ornate architectural features of buildings where openings allow for roosting, loafing, and nest-building. Nests consist of sticks, twigs, and grasses clumped together to form a crude platform. Pigeons are monogamous. Eight to 12 days after mating, the females lay 1 or 2 eggs which hatch after 18 days. The male provides nesting material and guards the female and the nest. The young are fed pigeon milk, a liquid solid substance secreted in the crop of the adult (both male and female) that is regurgitated. The young leave the nest at 4 to 6 weeks of age. More eggs are laid before the first clutch leaves the nest. Breeding may occur at all seasons, but peak reproduction occurs in the spring and fall. A population of pigeons usually consists of equal numbers of males and females. In captivity, pigeons commonly live up to 15 years and sometimes longer. In urban populations, however, pigeons seldom live more than 3 or 4 years. Natural mortality factors, such as predation by mammals and other birds, diseases, and stress due to lack of food and water, reduce pigeon populations by approximately 30% annually.

Damage

Pigeon droppings deface and accelerate the deterioration of buildings and increase the cost of maintenance. Large amounts of droppings may kill vegetation and produce an objectionable odor. Pigeon manure deposited on park benches, statues, cars, and unwary pedestrians is aesthetically displeasing. Around grain handling facilities, pigeons consume and contaminate large quantities of food destined for human or livestock consumption. Pigeons may carry and spread diseases to people and livestock through their droppings. They are known to carry or transmit pigeon ornithosis, encephalitis, Newcastle disease, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, salmonella food poisoning, and several other diseases. Additionally, under the right conditions pigeon manure may harbor airborne spores of the causal agent of histoplasmosis, a systemic fungus disease that can infect humans. The ectoparasites of pigeons include various species of fleas, lice, mites, ticks, and other biting insects, some of which readily bite people. Some insects that inhabit the nests of pigeons are also fabric pests and/or pantry pests. The northern fowl mite found on pigeons is an important poultry pest. Pigeons located around airports can also be a threat to human safety because of potential bird-aircraft collisions, and are considered a medium priority hazard to jet aircraft by the US Air Force.

Starling

This European Starling is the second most bird called about. These will nest in your dryer vents, and plumbing vents.

 

Identification

Starlings are robin-sized birds weighing about 3.2 ounces (90 g). Adults are dark with light speckles on the feathers. The speckles may not show at a distance. The bill of both sexes is yellow during the reproductive cycle (January to June) and dark at

other times. Juveniles are pale brown to gray. Starlings generally are chunky and hump-backed in appearance, with a shape similar to that of a meadowlark. The tail is short, and the wings have a triangular shape when outstretched in flight. Starling flight is direct and swift, not rising and falling like the flight of many blackbirds.

Range

Since their introduction into New York in the 1890s, starlings have spread across the continental United States, northward to Alaska and the southern half of Canada, and southward into northern Mexico. They are native to Eurasia, but have also been introduced in South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and elsewhere.

Habitat

Starlings are found in a wide variety of habitats including cities, towns, farms, ranches, open woodlands, fields, and lawns. Ideal nesting habitat would include areas with trees or other structures that have cavities suitable for nesting and short grass (turf) areas or grazed pastures for foraging. Ideal winter habitat would include areas with structures and/or tall trees for daytime loafing (resting) and nighttime roosting; and grazed pastures, open water areas, and livestock facilities for foraging.

Food Habits

Starlings consume a variety of foods, including fruits and seeds of both wild and cultivated varieties. Insects, especially Coleoptera and Lepidoptera lawn grubs, and other invertebrates total about one-half of the diet overall, and are especially important during the spring breeding season. Other items including livestock rations and food in garbage become an important food base for wintering starlings.

General Biology, Reproduction, and Behavior

European starlings were brought into the United States from Europe. They were released in New York City in 1890 and 1891 by an individual who wanted to introduce to the United States all of the birds mentioned in Shakespeare’s works. Since that time, they have increased in numbers and spread across the country. They were first observed in Nebraska in 1930, in Colorado in 1939, and in California in 1942. The starling  population in the United States is estimated at 140 million birds. Starlings nest in holes or cavities almost anywhere, including tree cavities, birdhouses, and holes in buildings or cliff faces. Females lay 4 to 7 eggs which hatch after 11 to 13 days of incubation. Young leave the nest when they are about 21 days old. Both parents help build the nest, incubate the eggs, and feed the young. Sometimes 2 clutches of eggs are laid per season, but most of the production is from the first brood fledged. Although starlings are not always migratory, some will migrate up to several hundred miles, while others may remain in the same general area throughout the year. Hatching-year starlings are more likely to migrate than adults, and they tend to migrate farther. Outside the breeding season, starlings feed and roost together in flocks. Starling and blackbird flocks often roost together in urban landscape trees or in small dense woodlots or overcrowded tree groves. They choose trees or groves that offer ample perches so that all may roost together. In colder weather they choose dense vegetation such as coniferous trees or structures (such as barns, urban structures) that provide protection from wind and cold. Fall-roosting flocks are relatively small (from several hundred to several thousand birds), but because they are spread over large geographic areas, they can cause widespread nuisance problems. In contrast, winter-roosting flocks are large (sometimes exceeding  1 million birds), but are often confined to a few acres (ha). Some of the winter roosting areas are occupied by starlings year after year. Each day they may fly 15 to 30 or more miles (24 to 48 km) from roosting to feeding sites. During the day when not feeding, they may perch in smaller groups inside farm buildings or in other warm, protected spots in and around urban structures.

Damage and Damage Identification

Starlings are frequently considered pests because of the problems they cause, especially at livestock facilities and near urban roosts. Starlings may selectively eat the high protein supplements that are often added to livestock rations. Starlings may also be responsible for transferring disease from one livestock facility to another. This is of particular concern to swine producers. Tests have shown that the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGE) can pass through the digestive tract of a starling and be infectious in the starling feces. Researchers, however, have also found healthy swine in lots with infected starlings. This indicates that even infected starlings may not always transmit the disease, especially if starling interaction with pigs is minimized. TGE may also be transmitted on boots or vehicles, by stray animals, or by infected swine added to the herd. Although starlings may be involved in the spread of other livestock diseases, their role in transmission of these diseases is not yet understood. Starlings cause other damage by consuming cultivated fruits such as grapes, peaches, blueberries, strawberries, figs, apples, and cherries. They were recently found to damage ripening (milk stage) corn, a problem primarily associated with blackbirds. In some areas starlings pull sprouting grains, particularly winter wheat, and eat the planted seed. Starlings may damage turf on golf courses as they probe for grubs, but the frequency and extent of such damage is not well documented. The growing urbanization of wintering starling flocks seeking warmth and shelter for roosting may have serious consequences. Large roosts that occur in buildings, industrial structures, or, along with blackbird species, in trees near homes are a problem in both rural and urban sites because of health concerns, filth, noise, and odor. In addition, slippery accumulations of droppings pose safety hazards at industrial structures, and the acidity of droppings is corrosive. Starling and blackbird roosts located near airports pose an aircraft safety hazard because of the potential for birds to be ingested into jet engines, resulting in aircraft damage or loss and, at times, in human injuries. In 1960, an Electra aircraft in Boston collided with a flock of starlings soon after takeoff, resulting in a crash landing and 62 fatalities. Although only about 6% of bird-aircraft strikes are associated with starlings or blackbirds, these species represent a substantial management challenge at airports. One of the more serious health concerns is the fungal respiratory disease histoplasmosis. The fungus Histoplasma capsulatum may grow in the soils beneath bird roosts, and spores become airborne in dry weather, particularly when the site is disturbed. Although most cases of histoplasmosis are mild or even unnoticed, this disease can, in rare cases, cause blindness and/or death. Individuals who are weakened by other health conditions or who do not have endemic immunity are at greater risk from histoplasmosis. Starlings also compete with native cavity-nesting birds such as blue birds, flickers, and other woodpeckers, purple martins, and wood ducks for nest sites. One report showed that, where nest cavities were limited, starlings had severe impacts on local populations of native cavity-nesting species. One author has speculated that competition with starlings may cause shifts in red-bellied woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) nesting from urban habitats to rural forested areas where starling competition is less.

Woodpecker

Although not known as a normal nuisance, woodpeckers damage structures in search of Carpenter Bee Larva.

 

Identification

Woodpeckers belong to the order Piciformes and the family Picidae, which also includes flickers and sapsuckers. Twenty-one species inhabit the United States. Woodpeckers have short legs with two sharp-clawed, backward-pointed toes and stiff tail feathers, which serve as a supportive prop. These physical traits enable them to cling easily to the trunks and branches of trees, wood siding, or utility poles while pecking. They have stout, sharply pointed beaks for pecking into wood and a specially developed long tongue that can be extended a considerable distance. The tongue is used to dislodge larvae or ants from their burrows in wood or bark. Woodpeckers are 7 to 15 inches (18 to 38 cm) in length, and usually have brightly contrasting coloration. Most males have some red on the head, and many species have black and white marks. Identification of species by their markings is quite easy. In most species, flight is usually undulating, with wings folded against the body after each burst of flaps.

Range

Woodpeckers are found throughout the United States. The three most widely distributed species are the hairy woodpecker (Picoides villosus), the downy woodpecker (P. pubescens,), and the yellow-bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius). Different species are responsible for damage in different regions.

Habitat

Because they are dependent on trees for shelter and food, woodpeckers are found mostly in or on the edge of wooded areas. They nest in cavities chiseled into tree trunks, branches, or structures, or use natural or preexisting cavities. Many species nest in human-made structures, and have thus extended their habitat to include wooden fence posts, utility poles, and buildings. Because of this, woodpeckers may be found in localities where trees are scarce in the immediate vicinity.

Food Habits

Most woodpeckers feed on tree-living or wood-boring insects; however, some feed on a variety of other insects. Some flickers obtain the majority of their food by feeding on insects from the ground, especially ants. Others feed primarily on vegetable matter, such as native berries, fruit, nuts, and certain seeds. In some areas, the diet includes cultivated fruit and nuts. The sapsuckers, as the name suggests, feed extensively on tree sap as well as insects.

Call (678)340-3269 to schedule an appointment.

 

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